Photo courtesy of Äniks

The Hit ListPortland

The Resy Hit List: Where In Portland You’ll Want to Eat in June 2024

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There’s no question we hear more often: Where should I go eat? And while we at Resy know it’s an honor to be the friend who everyone asks for restaurant advice, we also know it’s a complicated task. That’s where the Resy Hit List comes in.

We’ve designed it to be your essential resource for dining in Portland: a monthly-updated (and now expanded!) guide to the restaurants in that you won’t want to miss — tonight or any night.

Five Things In Portland Not to Miss This Month

  • Patio Season Returns: With summer weather rolling in, it can only mean one thing: true patio season is back. Savor warm nights with KBBQ at Jeju, wood-fired pizza at Firehouse, French classics at Deadshot, or out on the rooftop at Tope.
  • Popping Up: Every Sunday from 12-5 p.m., find queer, female-owned winery Landmass pouring tastings and glasses of their beautiful Columbia River Gorge wines inside Fremont Street plant shop, Crewel Summer. With a line-up of beautiful sparkling wines, crushable chillable reds, and summer-ready whites, there’s few better places to quell the Sunday scaries.
  • Han Oak Karaoke: Karaoke fans, rejoice! Twice a week, the Han Oak crew will be bringing back karaoke nights in full. Full details still to come, but expect the same great menu to sustain you while you belt the night away with DJ KoKo at the helm.
  • Kann Do: Great news for Amex Platinum card members — the perennially hard-to-snag reservation at Kann just got easier. The live fire Haitian restaurant is participating in “40 Nights of Platinum,” with opportunities for card members to get exclusive access to select Resys. Kann proudly showcases chef Gregory Gourdet’s Haitian heritage in one of the city’s most gorgeous dining rooms.
  • Get Your Custard On: Cornet Custard, from Mika Paredes and Naomi Pomeroy of Beast fame, is opening a second shop in the former Woodsman Market space along Southeast Division. Though there’s no official open date yet, we’re counting down until we can get our hands on a pint of the ultra-rich (12 egg yolks per quart rich!) custard in all its fantastic, seasonal flavors (hello, lemon meringue pie).

New to the Hit List (June 2024)
Äniks, Mestizo, Ox Restaurant.

1. Kann Southeast Portland

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Photo courtesy of Kann

Portland’s arguably most sought-after restaurant proudly focuses on chef Gregory Gourdet’s Haitian heritage. And it’s still worth trying to snag a reservation. The James Beard Award-winning menu is truly best suited for joyous reunion, with groups of four to six (or more in the private dining space!) getting a chance to try a little bit of everything if you’re sharing across the table. Don’t miss the signature dishes — the plaintain brioche and the griyo twice-cooked pork — as well as any number of plates emerging from the wood-fired hearth. We’re partial to the red cabbage with smoked herring and African pepper sauce and a glazed duck breast and leg, lacquered with cane syrup. Add in sides to share, and desserts, and you’ll see why Gourdet is so lauded.

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Photo courtesy of Kann

2. ÄNIKS Kerns

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A brand new, $215 tasting menu restaurant is taking Oregon’s local flora and fauna to some of its most avant-garde places yet. The ambitious, 16-seat Äniks, from Quaintrelle’s Ryley Eckersley, hopes to give diners a wholly three-dimensional food experience, with not only thought-provoking dishes inspired by custom tarot-esque cards, but numerous drink pairings, from wine to cocktails to kombucha, and musical pairings for each dish. Expect dishes and menus to mimic the ephemerality of Portland’s seasons and ingredients, changing often and never around for long. Where will dinner take you this week? There’s only one way to find out.

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3. Jeju Restaurant Central Eastside Portland

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Peter Cho and Sun Young Park’s (Han Oak, Toki) latest restaurant is dedicated to upscale Korean barbecue. The menu takes guests through a quartet of banchan, a cold and hot starter — recently a dry-aged Hawaiian kampachi and the signature pan-fried mandu resting in a pool of black vinegar broth — before a hearty ssam spread of wood-fired, whole-animal barbecue. Meats range from bulgogi marinated steak and pork coppa to spicy sausages made in-house and sliced short rib, as well as substantial vegetarian options. After dinner, in true Han Oak family fashion, guests are welcome to try their hand at karaoke.

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4. Bellwether Bar Montavilla

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Residing in Montavilla’s historic Thomas Graham building, Bellwether Bar is the kind of spot you dream of having in your own neighborhood (and lucky you who already do). Outfitted in dark wood paneling and coffered ceilings, the airy space seemingly has a heartbeat of its own. Add to it a fantastic food menu — which lands somewhere between upscale bar food and French bistro; a fantastic cocktail list — numbered, for ease; and a fantastic beer and wine list, and you’ve created the perfect formula for any night, whether for big group outings (don’t miss the enormous outdoor patio) or romantic date nights snuggled into a cozy booth.

5. The Paper Bridge Central Eastside

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Photo courtesy of The Paper Bridge

It’s not a stretch to say there’s no Vietnamese restaurant in town like this. At Paper Bridge, which opened late last year in the same building as Scotch Lodge, most of the Northern Vietnamese menu book is dedicated to extensive descriptions of each dish. For every item, the restaurant offers a miniature history lesson and glossary entry, often noting the origins, regional significance and geography alongside descriptions of ingredients and cooking techniques. Last month, we spent nearly 10 minutes getting ready to order, as we flipped between the menu and its descriptions, settling on rare-to-Portland dishes like stir-fried morning glory with three types of garlic, a classic bún chả Hanoi, and the addictive, piping hot Hai Phong-style breadsticks with pate. Post dinner, we asked for menus again … to study up for next time.

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Photo courtesy of The Paper Bridge

6. No Saint Vernon

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Since it opened a little more than a year ago, No Saint has emerged as one of the best new pizza restaurants in the city. Find a handful of simple antipasti: think housemade focaccia and olives alongside composed plates like a fall burrata with blueberry mostarda and mortadella. Salads highlight seasonal bounty; a recent radish and apple salad showcased a highwire act of bitterness and sweetness. And of course, the pizzas, with a wonderfully chewy, fire-kissed crust supporting a cast of toppings you’re unlikely to find anywhere else. Don’t miss the quince and pepperoni, the Portland version of a Hawaiian; or the a pear and sausage, which brings the best of a pear salad and sausage pie together.

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7. Xiao Ye Hollywood

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This “first generation American” restaurant from partners Jolyn Chen and Louis Lin (Rose’s Luxury in D.C., Felix in L.A.) was one of the city’s most anticipated restaurant openings last year. The short-but-sweet, dinner party-esque menu boasts five sections, each offering two to three multinational dishes. Plates kick off with mini madeleines with whipped butter and jalapeño powder and butter-basted chicken hearts, then weave between “cold,” “warm,” and “bigger stuff,” and land at “sweets.” A radicchio and winter citrus salad with cashew yogurt and vegan XO balances out headliner dishes like the rigatoni all’amatriciana, the half fried chicken with S&B curry jus, or Japanese sweet potato with miso butter and celeriac slaw.

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8. L’Orange SE Portland, Hosford-Abernethy, Ladd's Addition

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L’Orange, the winery restaurant from Joel Stocks (Holdfast) and winemaker Jeff Vejr (Holdfast, Les Caves), is one of those born-beloved Portland spots you forget has only been around for a short while. The western Mediterranean plays heavy inspiration here, with much of the menu frolicking between seasonal salads, composed small plates, and larger entrees, often incorporating some form of seafood, like mussels and clams with roasted fennel and smoked and roasted sturgeon with oil-cured black olive. Wines will be a particular draw here as well, with bottles representing southern France through the Italian Riviera.

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9. Ox Restaurant Eliot

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This beloved Argentine grill has had a commanding presence over Portland’s dining scene since it opened a decade ago, thanks to its all-stunners-only menu. After several months of rebuilding from a kitchen fire, the restaurant finally appears set to reopen in July, and we couldn’t be happier. Any night here should start with something from the always fantastic cocktail list (the Dirty Grandma Agnes martini is a mainstay) or a glass from the beautiful wine list before delving into the by-land-and-sea menu. As a citywide stalwart, numerous iconic dishes have earned their keep over the years, like the clam chowder with smoked marrow bone and the tripe and octopus, that should be part of your order. Meat options rotate throughout the year, but when the halibut collar is on, it should be on everyone’s table, dietary restrictions aside.

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10. Feral Vernon

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Photo courtesy of Feral

Four days a week, plant-based Feral is plating up hyper-seasonal dishes unlike any other restaurant in town. On a visit, you might try the cannellini carbonara toast, studded with smoked tofu lardons; the peanut butter & jelly cabbage, brined and blackened over coals, brightened with dekopon mandarin jelly; or the lion’s mane cordon bleu, paired with smoked pimenton parsnip and pommes puree; it is easy to forget as each new arrival hits the table that everything is vegan. Head here to experience the most of each season.

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Photo courtesy of Feral

11. Yaowarat Montavilla

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Yaowarat, from the ever-popular Langbaan and Eem family, opened to fanfare last year. A meditation on Thailand’s Chinatown, Yaowarat combines the cocktail prowess of Eric Nelson and Kyle Linden Webster (Expatriate) with the culinary might of Thai chefs Kanokwan “Nok” Jinuntuya and Taweesak “Tee” Teesompong. The menu – more of a meditation on a summer trip than a 1:1 recreation of the bustling neighborhood – features both new and familiar dishes, including Yaowarat road squid, spiked with garlic and Thai chiles; lap cheong fried rice studded with gingko nuts and prik nam pla; and mapo tofu, simmered with ground beef and pork and soft egg tofu.

Find more info here.

12. Mestizo Richmond

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This gluten- and soy-free Latin American restaurant has been a popular spot for fish, vegan dishes, fun cocktails and happy hour since it opened at the end of 2019. More than four years later, the restaurant remains a bright spot along Division’s restaurant row, with its bright and crunchy tapas, like fried oysters with fresno chile jam and vegan mushroom empanadas with pickliz and mojo aioli; a duet of ceviche, both vegan-friendly and not; and fish and meat-heavy entrees like adobo branzino, carne asada tostones, and arroz con pollo.

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13. Laurelhurst Market Laurelhurst

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There’s a reason Laurelhurst, with its side-by-side in-house butcher shop and restaurant, remains one of Portland’s most popular spots. Known for its ultra high-quality meats —  available for purchase in the adjacent butcher shop — Laurelhurst has been a local stalwart for the past 15 years. The menu has remained simple but fantastically executed: a handful of lovely starters, including an all-made-in-house charcuterie board; a trio of seasonal salads, punched-up sides, and a wide variety of mains. Don’t feel like you have to always go with steak or a pork chop, either. The eponymous burger, topped with grilled onions and white cheddar, is one of the best in town.

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14. Cafe Olli MLK Boulevard

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This airy, all-day cafe not only boasts some of the best pizza in town, but one of the best brunches and some of the best baked goods. (And lunch? And bread?). During the day, the simple, seasonal menu veers toward both sweet and savory things served with or on toast. There’s a fantastic breakfast sandwich on a housemade milk bun and a whipped ricotta toast that could also double as a decadent, but not overly sweet, dessert. At night, the menu keeps its simple mantra, trading out toast and eggs for pizza, pasta, vegetables, snacks, and protein-rich mains. The absolute can’t-miss pizza stunner is a simple one: the pomodoro pie with added stracciatella (+$4) and a side of Calabrian chile honey.

No reservations.

15. Quaintrelle Southeast Portland

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Taking up residence in Southeast Clinton’s former Burrasca space, Quaintrelle has continued its fine-dining flair in a space that feels much more like home. The menu here spans a range of options and levels of commitment, from a la carte dishes to tasting menus in seven- and 10-course iterations. Dishes, regardless of menu choice, all remain ever-changing but always seasonal and gorgeous. Menus typically start with some form of oyster, often delivered on a bed of shells mimicking tidepools, before winding through a luxurious caviar course, salads, meats, and fish, all set with local produce. Cocktails, too, remain as ephemeral as the changing seasons, built out with fresh fruits, herbs, and savory elements.

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16. Tulip Shop Tavern Killingsworth

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It’s hard to find another word to describe Tulip Shop Tavern other than “cool.” The shotgun space, an homage to the diner and roadside tavern, comes from two Rum Club alums and serves some of the city’s best sandwiches and cocktails. The top spot goes to their burger, which is worth the trip alone, arriving in a trio of iterations but centered on the standard special sauce, American cheese, pickles, and shredduce calculus. The fish sandwich, breaded in panko and slathered in tartar sauce, also is excellent, as is the fried pork tenderloin, an honorable tribute to the Midwest staple.

No reservations. More info here.

17. Kachka Goat Blocks

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Still arguably the most talked-about Russian restaurant in America, Kachka has remained a shining star in Portland’s dining scene since it opened 10 years ago. The menu – broken into four sections — showcases dressed up versions of classic dishes from Belarus, Ukraine, Russia, and Georgia. It has, gratefully, changed little since its first days. You’ll still find the ombre-like Herring “Under a Fur Coat,” the mayo-laced Russian “salad;” boards boasting caviar and roe, pickles, house-cured meats, and breads; phenomenal pelmeni; and the iconic cozy clay-pot rabbit. Now wonderfully expanded: the restaurant’s phenomenal house-infused vodkas.

Call 503-235-0059 for more info.

18. Cafe Nell Northwest District

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This longtime slice of “Old Portland,” has been serving the Northwest Portland neighborhood French-influenced PNW classics like steak frites, grilled salmon and Dungeness crab salad for 15 years. The all-day, every day restaurant has something for everyone at almost any time of day, whether it’s blowout weekend brunch, daily happy hour bites from 3-6 p.m., midday lunch or Wednesday $9 cocktails, glass pours and plates for its weekly “Girls Night Out.”

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19. Grana Pizza Napoletana Kerns

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Former farmers market pop-up Grana Pizza has retired their dual portable Ooni ovens for a brick-and-mortar space. These days, find bubbly, charred pies topped with everything from the classic margherita to black truffle specials. Grana’s other claim to fame? Their entry into Portland’s burgeoning portafoglio and panuzzo market. These folded pizzas and “pizza dough sandwiches,” whose mortadella-stuffed pockets have been popping up across town, are the perfect amalgamation of sandwich, calzone and pizza. Grana’s range from mortadella (natch) to diavola, spiked with Calabrian chiles.

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20. St. Jack Slabtown

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Photo courtesy of St. Jack

This longtime Portland French bistro remains a citywide favorite, thanks to its straightforward menu, excellent attention to culinary detail, and a fantastic beverage list. Start with the butter lettuce salad, one of the city’s most recognizable salads (it’s Portland, there are a few!), layered with avocado, sliced radish, and croutons, tossed in a Dijon vinaigrette and a dusting of fine herbs, before diving into chicken liver mousse, beef tartare, and maybe a foie gras terrine. From there, the menu stays on the bistro track, with a classic and wonderful steak frites — one of the few in town — moules marinère, and duck l’orange. We love grabbing a seat along the bar near the iconic melted wax candles that have been a constant since the restaurant’s early days in Southeast more than a decade ago.

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Photo courtesy of St. Jack